March of the Dinosaurs on ITV

Narrated by Stephen Fry, this new feature length animation tells a story that’s 70 million years old. New discoveries reveal that once, at the top of the world, arctic dinosaurs faced a heroic struggle for survival every year.

In the prehistoric North Pole, summers are warm but as winter sets in, plants shrivel and die, temperatures plummet and darkness creeps over the land. The North Pole becomes a deathtrap and its dinosaurs face a thousand mile journey over hostile territory in a desperate march south to find the sun.

70 million years ago, The Earth was a much warmer place, and in the summer forest vegetation provided a fertile feast for the some of the planet’s biggest and hungriest creatures – dinosaurs.

The programme follows two young dinosaurs – Scar, a young vegetarian Edmontosaurus who hatched in the spring, and Patch, a young male feathered, raptor-like Troodon. As a carnivore, Patch has feasted all summer on baby Edmontosaurus. Unfortunately for him his favourite food is now bigger than he is but Troodon are clever, born to hunt and kill.

Troodon like Patch are equipped to cope through the winter and the film follows his stay in the harsh North. But it will be survival of the fittest as they fight for the remaining food in the permanent darkness. Everyone and everything is fair game.

For Scar, his summer playground becomes a winter killing field as enemies patrol the darkness. The Gorgosaurus, a 30ft long, 2 tonne beast is equipped with highly-sensitive night vision and is the consummate nocturnal killer. For dinosaurs like Scar to avoid these predators, their only option is exodus.

The looming arctic winter will steal a little more light from every day until the sun disappears completely so Scar’s herd must also leave on a great march South – to find enough food and light to survive the winter.

After one week the migrating herds have reached the edge of the Arctic forest but the open landscape is a hostile new world and Scar faces the new challenge of being exposed to snow.

After the Edmontosaurus have been moving south for almost a month, starvation and exhaustion are taking their toll. To Scar the herd has always meant safety, but the weaker ones begin to collapse and die around him, ending their lives as meat on a volcanic wasteland.

As the herds continue their trek, can they battle against extreme weather, predators and lack of food to make it over a thousand miles to their winter safe haven?

Saturday, 23 April 2011, 5:00PM – 7:00PM